New York Times recounts their favorite photographs they took in 2017.

It’s no secret that the New York Times is one of the most excelling and established publications around, both through their written journalism and their visual content. Decidedly (and rightfully) proud of their Photographers’ work, they have now recounted the best of the best photographs that made up 2017. Here at No Sleep New York, we have chosen our favorites of their favorites. Scroll through to see the images and what they had to say about them!

We want art to transport us, to take us beyond ourselves and the stubborn gravity of our lives. That’s one lesson from the selection of exceptional arts photography below, all commissioned or published by our photo editors this year.

But that’s not all. The best artists can stir up deep feelings and remind us what it means to be human. In these times, fresh perspectives are in demand — new eyes with which to see and get to know the world. Art can give us the fuel we need to move forward.

Introduction by 
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The artist Sheena Rose at her home studio in Barbados. “I see this photo as a collaboration,” the photographer, Rose Marie Cromwell said of the shoot. “Sheena often uses costumes that she has made or appropriated for performances.”CreditRose Marie Cromwell for The New York Times
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“We have a habit of sticking people in flower bushes because Los Angeles is full of them. Kumail Nanjiani kindly obliged and made the bougainvillea part of his ensemble.” Brinson+Banks for The New York Times
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The Jamaican reggae musician Chronixx, left, performing in Brooklyn in July. Credit: Vincent Tullo for The New York Times
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Credit: Ryan Pfluger for The New York Times
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Moses Sumney’s debut album, “Aromanticism,” examined the ways we idealize couples in love. Credit: Elizabeth Weinberg for The New York Times
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Kahlil Joseph, on his film “Fly Paper,” which had its debut at the New Museum in the fall. Credit: Jake Michaels for The New York Times
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Credit: Nathan Bajar for The New York Times
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A classic car became a classical music instrument when the composer Ryoji Ikeda’s “A (for 100 Cars)” had its premiere in Los Angeles in October. Credit: Andrew White for The New York Times
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Credit: Sara Krulwich for The New York Times
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Credit: Graham Walzer for The New York Times
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The photographer Sarah Blesener got a rare look behind a curtain call on the stage of the Metropolitan Opera while following the dancer Christine Shevchenko. Credit: Sarah Blesener for The New York Times
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The costumes for “The Handmaid’s Tale” are practically characters in themselves. So, fittingly, the show’s costume designer, Ane Crabtree, helped the photographer Stephanie Gonot style a shoot for a feature on the Hulu streaming series. Credit: Photo illustration by Stephanie Gonot for The New York Times
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Credit: Vincent Tullo for The New York Time
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Martha Graham, whose works, including a shorter version of “Clytemnestra,” featuring PeiJu Chien-Pott, above, were performed in February by the dance company she founded in 1926. Credit: Andrea Mohin for The New York Times
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For the opening of Building 6 at Mass MoCA this year, the “air-and-space magician” James Turrell created nine light-centered environments, which our art critic Roberta Smith described as “an elliptical mandala of colored light.” Credit: Tony Cenicola for The New York Time
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Credit: Ike Edeani for The New York Times
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Credit: Valerie Chiang for The New York Times
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Credit: Sasha Arutyunova for The New York Times
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Credit: Bryan Derballa for The New York Times
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Sam Smith wanted to make a splash, so the photographer Ryan Pfluger had him jump in the pool. Credit: Ryan Pfluger for The New York Times
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Credit: Ryan Pfluger for The New York Times.

 

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